Yellow Lake

Last year I had an epiphany.  Well, maybe it wasn’t so much an epiphany as it was a realization.  My life had changed.  I wasn’t required to work seven days per week anymore.  I had actual days off, and I could use them for things like, I don’t know, camping?  I used to love camping.  

I set about trying to get myself outfitted for some outdoor living.  Through Kijiji and other on-line sites, I ended up getting everything I needed for under $200.  Yes, I had to do some driving around, but it was well worth it.  

We didn’t do a lot of camping, Santana and I, because our days off didn’t match up, but we did manage to get out a few times.  Our first trip was to Keremeos to look for mountain goats.  We drove up and down the highway from Keremeos to Hedley for two days and never did find the goats.  But we had a lot of laughs.

I remembered the drive to Keremeos on Highway 3A. The area intrigued me and I meant to go back and have another look.  My chance for that came on the weekend.

My friend, Tania, and I made plans to go to Keremeos for the Similkameen Pow Wow of Champions.  Santana decided to come along for the ride.  We left early in the morning so we’d have time to stop along the way.

The turn off for Highway 3A is just south of Penticton, near Kaleden.  We wound our way through the rocky outcrops and forests, past the community of Twin Lakes, until we reached a lake.  Strangely, this is not one of the Twin Lakes – you need to take a different road to get to them and that’s a trip for another day.

This is Yellow Lake, a popular spot for fishing. We walked the boardwalk to the floating dock where people were lined up on the dock in camp chairs, casting their lines out over the water.  We arrived just in time to watch an angler bring in his catch.  

Too small for dinner, but promising, all the same. The lake is stocked with Rainbow Trout, Brook Trout, and Kokanee Salmon.  You can also catch Perch and Goldfish.  

Yes, Goldfish.  Apparently, the dumping of live Goldfish in the waters of Yellow Lake has been a problem.  The population has grown and threatens the natural eco-system of the lake.  The article I read was from November of 2017 and I was unable to find any information about what, if any, action is being taken to combat the problem.

Whether you’re an angler or not, Yellow Lake is a quiet, peaceful place to spend some time.  The waters are full of plant life, making it quite attractive to ducks.  

Heavily scented wildflowers that I can’t name line the path, and the soft buzzing of pollinators is almost hypnotic.

At the West end of the lake there is another rest stop, complete with picnic tables and flush toilets.  There is also a boat launch there, but there are restrictions on the use of motors.

It’s my understanding that there are hiking trails on the other side of the lake, moderate to difficult due to the elevation, but I’d be happy to just sit here, looking up at the cliffs instead of trying to climb them.

Different strokes.

Author: Featherstone Creative

Sally Quon is a photographer and writer living in the beautiful Okanagan Valley. When not out enjoying the splendors of nature, she likes to spend time cooking, reading and painting. Her photography has appeared in Canadian Geographic Magazine and in Nature Alberta’s various birding brochures. Sally was recently awarded a Judge’s Choice Award in the Ontario Poetry Society’s Ultra Short Poem Competition and has an essay coming out in Chicken Soup for the Soul - The Forgiveness Fix. One of her photos was chosen for inclusion in the Photographer’s Forum “Best of 2018” Collection. She has two beautiful, almost grown children.

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