Idabel Lake

Holding the camera as steady as possible, I slowly exhaled and pressed the shutter button.  Nothing happened.  I adjusted the focus, held the camera steady, exhaled and pressed the shutter button.  Still nothing happened.  What the *#@&?

“Come ON!” I said, pulling the camera away from my face in order to look at it accusingly.  The two Columbian Ground Squirrels that, up until now, had been posing on a rock for me, decided that enough time had been wasted, and scampered away.  I examined the camera and, finding nothing amiss, tried to take a random shot of some trees.  Nothing.  This time, however, I could see that the battery light was blinking.

Of course.  This is what happens when you decide to take a road trip on no sleep but plenty of caffeine.  You forget things.  But really?  The battery?  How could I possibly have forgotten that?  Cursing myself, I got back in the Kia.  Nothing to do now but go home.  “But you’re not done!” the voice in my head protested.  The voice was right.  There were still two roads on this trip that I wanted to check out, and at least two places I told myself I would stop at on the way back.  Now I had to drive home and try NOT to see anything on the way.  Good luck with THAT.

Regardless, I was glad I came.

The day started early, and it was a lovely one.  The morning air was still cool, but the sky was a brilliant blue and the roads were quiet.  Starting out on Highway 33, I headed to the spot where McCulloch Road meets the highway.  From there I turned onto the forestry road.  Along the way there were openings in the trees where it was evident that clearcutting had taken place.

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Clearcut, OK Falls Forestry Road

Some of those areas had been reforested, while others had been left for Mother Nature to take care of.  The process is slow, but eventually life finds a way.

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American Robin, Juvenile

I didn’t know what I would find at Idabel Lake.  I had seen a sign for it while exploring McCulloch Road a few weeks back and made note of it as a place to visit in the future.  I didn’t look it up.  I’ve decided that I like the element of surprise in my travels.  I was surprised to find a paved road when I turned off the forestry road I was on.  I was even more surprised to find street signs.  This wasn’t just a random, wilderness lake.  This was a community.

There was a man walking down the middle of the road.  My window was open, and as I slowly passed, he turned and smiled.  I put my foot on the brake.

“Hi,” I said. “How are you today?”

“I’m good.”  He seemed to be waiting for me to continue, so I did.

“I’m just out having a look around.  I’ve never been here before.  I like to visit new places and take pictures of what I find.”

“You like nature?”

“Yes.”

“Me, too.  Are you headed to the beach?”

“Does this road take me there?”

“Yes.”

“Then I guess I am.”

“How long are you going to be there?  If you’re going to be a while, I’ll run home and get my phone so I can show you some of my pictures.”

“How long will that take?”

“About ten minutes.”

“Oh, yeah.  I’ll still be there.”

He waved and turned around.  I continued to the lake.

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Columbia Ground Squirrel

The “beach” was really a boat launch, with a couple of picnic tables nestled in the tall grass and daisies.  I climbed out of the Kia with my camera in hand.  A Columbian Ground Squirrel was standing in the grass next to the water.  A family of loons was visible, just offshore.

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Common Loon

The lake itself was beautiful, peaceful and still.  I looked out over the water and breathed deeply.  I don’t know what it was about this lake specifically, but it was the most idyllic place I’d come across yet.

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Idabel Lake

My new friend, Carmen, arrived with his phone in hand.  We sat on one of the picnic tables and he showed me some photos and a video he took of wildlife in the area.  He shared a little bit about his life and how he came to be there.  It was an altogether pleasant encounter, sitting in the sun with a stranger, enjoying the peace of the morning and the view of the lake.  I was glad we had met.

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Idabel Lake

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Yellow Water Lily, Idabel Lake

But there were more roads to follow, and this blog wasn’t going to write itself, so eventually, I packed up my lenses and moved on.  It was the very next stop I made that found me battery-less. In retrospect, I suppose I had seen all I needed to see in order to know I want to go back.  It just would have been nice to stay longer.

Author: Featherstone Creative

Sally Quon is a photographer and writer living in the beautiful Okanagan Valley. When not out enjoying the splendors of nature, she likes to spend time cooking, reading and painting. Her photography has appeared in Canadian Geographic Magazine and in Nature Alberta’s various birding brochures. Sally was recently awarded a Judge’s Choice Award in the Ontario Poetry Society’s Ultra Short Poem Competition and has an essay coming out in Chicken Soup for the Soul - The Forgiveness Fix. One of her photos was chosen for inclusion in the Photographer’s Forum “Best of 2018” Collection. She has two beautiful, almost grown children.

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